The size of your condom is one of the most important things to consider when looking for an effective and reliable contraceptive barrier. If your condom is too big, semen can escape, or the condom can slip off, potentially impregnating your partner or passing on a sexually transmitted disease. On the other hand, if your condom is too small or tight, it can break or tear easily, rendering it useless.

Today we’ll be covering everything you need to know about picking the right condom size for your penis. If you’d like to know more, check out the rest of the article below.

Table of Contents:

Are All Condoms the Same Size?

Open Packet Condom

No - condoms are available in many different sizes and thicknesses, depending on your requirements.

What Different Types of Condoms Are Available?

There are many different types of condoms, most of which are just as effective as each other. However, if you are new to buying condoms, you need to know what you are looking for.

  • Latex, plastic, and lambskin condoms: Most condoms are made from natural rubber latex. However, if you have sensitive skin or are allergic to latex, you can find other condoms made from plastics like polyurethane and polyisoprene. Both latex and plastic condoms effectively prevent pregnancy and protect you from sexually transmitted infections during vaginal, anal, and oral sex. Natural or lambskin condoms are also available; they are made from materials taken from lamb intestines. These condoms prevent pregnancy. However, they have small openings that do not block STD pathogens.
  • Lubricated condoms: Lubricated condoms feature a thin coating of lubricant, preventing irritation and pain during sexual intercourse. Lube also prevents the condom from breaking. If you buy a non-lubricated condom, you may want to use lubricant anyway, making the act more comfortable and enjoyable. We recommend using water-based lubes intended for sex. Oil and silicone-based lubricants may damage the condom or cause an unpleasant reaction, defeating the purpose of using lubricant in the first place.
  • Spermicide-coated condoms: Spermicide is a chemical called nonoxynol-9 that specifically kills sperm. Some condoms are coated with spermicide, lowering the chance of pregnancy. However, the amount of spermicide included usually does not make much difference. If you want to incorporate spermicide into sex with your partner, you may want to buy it separately. However, spermicide can irritate the genitals and could heighten the risk of catching an STD like HIV.
  • Textured condoms: These condoms include studded and ribbed condoms. They are designed to increase pleasure for you and your partner. However, some people do not enjoy the feel of textured condoms. If you do not enjoy standard condoms, textured products may be an option, but this involves a lot of trial and error.

You may also be tempted by novelty condoms, such as glow-in-the-dark condoms. However, you should exercise caution. These condoms are often not approved by CE or the British Standards Institution and may be less effective at preventing pregnancy and STD transmission. Ensure the condom packaging has the CE and Kite Mark before making your purchase.

Currently, there is only one type of female condom available. These condoms are pre-lubricated and made from latex-free nitrile. They are inserted into the vagina before sex. 1

How to Know What Size Condom to Buy

Condom Size

When purchasing condoms, it is important to know your penis size. As long as you know your penis size, you should be able to find the right condom for you.

What Do We Mean by Penis Size?

When we talk about penis size, we generally mean the length of the penis. Girth size refers to how thick your penis is mid-shaft or at the base.

How to Measure Your Penis Size

When measuring your penis size, start at the tip of the penis (the glans or the head) and measure right down to the base, where your pubic bone meets the base of your penis. If you want to make an accurate measurement, press in the fat around your pubic bone and only measure to the tip of the head; don’t include any extra foreskin that protrudes over the tip.

How to Measure Girth Size and Width

To measure your girth size, take a tape measure, and wrap it around the base of your penis or mid-shaft. Then, divide this number by 3.14 to find the width of your penis - this will help your choose the right condom.

What Is the Average Penis Size and Girth?

According to one comprehensive study, the average penis measures 3.61 inches when flaccid and 5.16 inches when erect. A flaccid penis has an average circumference of 3.66 inches, while erect penises have a 4.59-inch girth.

The same research suggests that larger and smaller penises are rare. Only five percent of men have a penis larger than 6.3 inches. Similarly, five percent of men have a penis that is smaller than 3.94 inches. 2

How Should a Condom Fit

Condom Fit

If a condom fits properly, it will cover the entire length of your penis and leave around half an inch of room at the top to collect sperm during ejaculation. Ideally, the condom will be snug but not uncomfortable or tight. You must measure your penis correctly to ensure the condom meets the above criteria. 3

Tips for Proper Male Condom Use

Men can put on a male condom any time before or during sex, preferably before any intercourse.

  • Ensure you do not break the condom when you tear open the packaging.
  • If the condom is stiff, sticky, brittle, or expired, throw it in the bin - it’s always better to be safe than sorry.
  • Roll the condom down your penis when you are erect; do so before you touch your partner.
  • Keep the condom on for the duration of sex, from start to finish.
  • Use a new condom every time you get an erection; if you use the same condom, sperm may spill out when you become flaccid.
  • If the condom does not have a reservoir tip (a teat at the head of the penis), pinch half an inch of material when putting it on; this will leave space to collect sperm when you orgasm.
  • If you feel the condom break during sex, stop what you are doing, pull out, and replace it with a new condom.
  • Hold the base of the condom when you pull out to ensure semen does not accidentally spill out.

Tips for Proper Female Condom Use

If using a female condom, make sure you insert the condom before having sex.

  • Apply lubricant to the outside of the closed end of the condom to allow easier insertion.
  • Ensure the condom is not twisted when you insert it into your vagina.
  • Stop having sex if you can feel your partner’s penis sliding between your body and the condom, if the outer ring goes inside your body, or if the condom changes position during intercourse. 1

Why Is Your Condom Not Staying on Properly When You’ve Chosen the Correct Size?

Some people find that their condom slips off even if they have bought the right size for their penis. Typically, a condom won’t slip off if you’ve measured your penis correctly and bought the correct size. However, if you are using the condom incorrectly, you may find it breaking or slipping off during sex. Some of the most common causes include:

You are not putting the condom on properly

If you put the condom on inside out, forget to roll it down to the base of the penis, or don’t put it on when your penis is fully erect, the condom may slip off during sex. The condom may also come off when you are withdrawing from your partner’s vagina or anus unless your hold the condom at the base firmly. Additionally, if you wait until your penis goes soft before withdrawing from your partner, the condom may slip off or spill.

You can prevent this by doing the following:

  • Put on your condom when your penis is erect.
  • Do not use your condom if you put it on inside out first. You can tell which way to condom should go, as the rim will be on the outside, making it easy to roll down your penis shaft.
  • Roll the condom down to the base of the penis. This will prevent it from rolling back up during intercourse.
  • Ensure the condom has enough lubricant, use your own lubricant, or make sure your partner has produced enough natural lubricant. Dryness and friction with enough lube may cause discomfort for yourself and your partner; the added friction will also make the condom slip off or break.
  • Make sure you pinch the reservoir tip or tea to remove air before putting on the condom. If air is left inside the tip, the condom may burst during sex.
  • Hold the condom at the base when withdrawing from your partner. Also, make sure you withdraw when your penis is still erect to prevent any spills.

You may be using too much lube

While many condoms come pre-lubricated, many people prefer additional lubrication inside the condom. However, if you use more than a couple of drops or apply the lubrication to the shaft rather than the tip, the inside can get very slippery, and the condom may roll off. As such, make sure you only add a sparse amount of lubricant.

You may have lost your erection

Many people lose their erections during sex, not just if they have erectile dysfunction. For example, if you are stressed or focusing too much on your partner, you can lose your erection while inside. You should withdraw straight away and throw the condom away if this happens. Try foreplay until you are hard again, then put on the new condom before re-engaging in intercourse. 4

The condom may be affected by sex positions

This may not happen all the time; however, some sex positions may make your condom slip down if you are not careful. If you find a position is detrimental to your condom, change up your moves. You may want to avoid that position in the future or alter your technique.

What Happens if the Condom Comes Off Before Ejaculation

If your condom comes off during sex but before ejaculation, both you and your partner face a higher risk of catching a sexually transmitted disease and increasing the chance of pregnancy.

Suppose you are in a committed and monogamous relationship (you only have relations with one person and vice versa), and you’ve both tested negative for any sexually transmitted diseases. In that case, there won’t be any additional risk of contracting any infections. However, if you or your partner have sex with other people (you are in a polyamorous relationship), you should speak to your doctor and get tested for diseases as soon as you can.

If you use condoms for contraception rather than STD protection (you may be in a monogamous relationship with somebody who doesn’t use hormonal contraception like an injection, pill, or device), you may risk pregnancy even if you did not ejaculate.

This is because the condom could be contaminated with semen produced when you get excited; the sperm still has a chance to find its way to the womb. As such, if the condom has come off or torn during sex and you do not use other contraception, you should speak to your doctor about emergency contraception (such as the morning after pill) straight away.

How Do I Know if My Condom Broke During Intercourse?

Many people wonder if there is any way you can tell if your condom has broken during sex.

In most cases, you’ll notice that sex feels different once the condom breaks. When this happens, withdraw your penis straight away, throw away the condom, and contact your doctor or pharmacy for emergency contraception and STD testing. Unfortunately, your partner may not be able to notice any differences, so it is up to you to pay attention and mention if something feels wrong.

However, in some cases, men will not be able to tell if the condom has been compromised. As such, you should check for leaks before throwing the condom in the bin. Simply run water into the condom; if there are any leaks, the condom has broken. You should assume the condom broke during sex and speak to your doctor. 4 ,5

Average and Medium Size Condoms

If you require an average or medium-sized condom, check out some of the following options.

Durex Thin Feel Extra Lubricated Condoms

These condoms are perfect for people who require extra lubrication (if your partner suffers from vaginal dryness or you enjoy anal sex). Much like the other condoms in the Durex Thin Feel range, these particular condoms are only 0.055mm thick and just as strong as you’d expect from one of the leading brands in the condom industry. In addition, they are 56mm wide and easy to slip on, never restricting your range of movement. They are also odourless and tasteless, so you can use them for oral sex.

EXS Air Thin Condoms

If you are looking for a condom that doesn’t get in the way of intimacy or closeness, you may want to try the EXS Air Thing Condom. This product is only 0.045mm thick and suitable for average-sized men. It is slightly larger than other medium-sized condoms but still fits snug at the base, keeping it in place during sex. The condom is suitable for vaginal, oral, and anal sex. In addition, it is made from all-natural materials and is excellent for sensitive skin.

Large and Wide Condoms

Large Size

Here at Condoms.uk, we stock many condoms for larger and wider penises. Some of our most popular products include:

Trojan Magnum Ribbed Condoms

Trojan’s Magnum Condoms have earned a formidable reputation among well-endowed men. In fact, their name is synonymous with larger penises and safe sex.

The condoms are made with ribs at the tip and base of the condom, which provides plenty of stimulation for both partners. The ribs at the tip are great for the wearer, while the ribs at the base will stimulate the g-spot and other sensitive areas around the vagina. In addition, these condoms have a roomy head and snug base, measuring 62mm at their widest point.

Glyde Supermax Condoms

Glyde Supermax Condoms are another reliable option for well-endowed men. These condoms are a substantial 200mm long and 60mm in nominal width. In addition, they are ultra-thin, thanks to patented “double-dipping” manufacturing processes, while still providing stress-free protection. They are lightly lubricated with silicone-based lubricant and are suitable for vaginal, oral, and anal sex. Finally, these condoms are vegan friendly and made from sustainable materials.

Small Condoms, Tiny Condoms, and Micropenis Condoms

Just like large and extra-large condoms, there are many condoms available for people who are below-average size.

In addition, If you have a micropenis, do not worry - plenty of condom brands make condoms that are suitable for your manhood.

What Is a Micropenis?

The term “micropenis” refers to a condition usually discovered in newborns following a routine examination. A micropenis is an abnormally small but otherwise normal-looking penis, often caused by genetic or hormonal abnormalities.

Important things to consider about micropenises:

  • Some men may think they have a micropenis. However, they are extremely rare, so it may not be the case.
  • Micropenises have a stretched penile length (SPL) of less than 2.5 standard deviations below the average for males around the same age.
  • So, the average male penis is roughly 5.25 inches. As such, a micropenis will measure under 3.5 inches.
  • Genetics may play a significant role in whether you have a micropenis.
  • There is no cure. However, hormone therapy is available to stimulate penis growth in children. 6

How Common Are Micropenises?

Micropenises are very uncommon. Estimates may vary, but research suggests that only 0.6 percent of men worldwide have a micropenis. For example, from 1997-to 2000, only 1.5 in 10,000 boys in the United States were born with a micropenis. 6

What Are the Measurements for Extra Small Condoms?

Here at Condoms.uk, we stock various condoms for less well-endowed men. These condoms vary in size, usually measuring 46 to 49mm in nominal width. Most small condoms in the UK and Europe meet these measurements. Some of the brands and styles we sell include My.Size, Glyde Slim Fit, Pasante Trime, EXS Snug Fit, and ON Little Tiger.

Which Extra Small Condoms Should You Buy?

My.SIZE Pro 45mm Condoms

My.SIZE is one of the most reliable brands for extra-small or micropenis condoms. For example, the Pro range offers various small sizes, including this 45mm option. These condoms are made from rubber latex, fitting snugly over your penis without restricting movement. They are also great for small sex toys like bullets. My.SIZE Pro Condoms are designed for slim shafts with a nominal width of 45mm. They are shorter than most condoms on the market and only 0.05mm thick, which is fantastic if you want to maintain intimacy.

My.SIZE also makes a Pro 47mm version of this condom, which works just as well as the 45mm variety.

Pasante Trim Condoms

Pasante Trim Condoms are another excellent option if regular condoms are too big for you. This range is designed for men who want a snug fit and reliable quality. Each condom is only 49mm in nominal width and 180mm long. Also, these condoms are only 0.07mm thick, perfect for intimacy and closeness with your partner.

In addition, Pasante Trim condoms are completely vegan; they do not contain any casein and are made from natural rubber latex. They are also lightly lubricated and tasteless, suitable for oral sex.

Japanese Condoms

Condoms.uk is a proud partner of Sagami Condoms, stocking the very best products direct from the brand.

Sagami is the most popular condom manufacturer in Japan and is solid in more than 50 countries worldwide. The company was established in 1934, becoming Japan’s first condom company. It was also the first company to develop dotted and coloured condoms.

Sagami Original condoms were first released in 1998 and are made from polyurethane. Sagami is a leader in polyurethane condom technology, choosing plastic for its lack of odour strength, compatibility with the human body, and ability to transmit body heat. These factors combine to make the condom remarkably different from traditional latex condoms.

You can find our entire Sagami range here.

In addition, if you would like to browse our entire condom selection, click here.

References

  1. https://www.webmd.com/sex/birth-control/birth-control-condoms
  2. https://www.science.org/content/article/how-big-average-penis
  3. https://www.insider.com/how-should-a-condom-fit
  4. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/contraception/male-condoms/
  5. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/ask-experts/what-do-i-do-if-the-condom-broke
  6. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/17955-micropenis