How are XL condoms different from large condoms?

Penises, like bodies, come in different shapes and sizes. And even if condom manufacturers around the world focus mainly on regular size condoms, most brands also offer smaller and larger sizes. That means there's a condom to fit practically every penis, for safe and enjoyable sex. 

In the UK and Europe, regular size condoms have a nominal width anywhere between 52mm and 56mm. Anything below 52mm of width is considered a small condom, whilst large condom sizes vary from 56mm to 60mm of nominal width.

However, condom sizes don’t stop here. If you need a nominal width higher than 60mm or higher, you simply need an XL condom.

Like all other sizes, XL condoms have various widths and lengths. Some manufacturers only make one size of XL condoms, whilst others offer several options in the extra-large department. Thus, you’ll be spoilt with choices no matter what size condom you need.

Do I really need an XL condom?

We live in a society that puts a lot of emphasis on size – a thing that determines some men to buy larger size condoms just to impress their partners. However, buying a condom larger than you need isn’t wise. If the condom is too loose, it can easily slide off during sex, especially if your partner is not wet enough (and you fail to use intimate lubricant) or if you decide to lubricate the inside of the condom.

There are two ways to determine if you really need an XL condom. The first is trial and error, starting with a regular size condom and trying other sizes until you find the one that fits right. The other way is to measure your penis.

When measuring your condom to find the right size, the most important number is your penis circumference. Here’s how to do it.

You will need:

How to measure:

What to do if I need a longer but snugger condom?

Most condoms on the market are longer than necessary, so finding the right size based on both width and length should be easy. If you’ve tried a condom from one brand that fits right around your penis but that is too short (you can’t roll it all the way down to the base of your shaft), it is worth checking out condom sizes from other brands.

For instance, some 60mm condoms are 190mm long, whilst others reach a length of 220mm whilst maintaining the same nominal width. Some brands, such as Durex, even manufacture regular width condoms (53-56mm of nominal width) that are over 190mm long.

Considering that the average penis length is much shorter (around 130mm to 150mm) and that very few men have a penis longer than 180mm, it is highly unlikely to have issues with the condom length.

However, if you can’t find a condom that suits your length and that fits snugly enough, you should look into alternative solutions, such as female condoms. Buying an XL condom based on length alone isn’t recommended because if the condom fits loosely around your penis, it could slide off during intercourse and leave you and your partner unprotected.

What else are XL condoms used for?

Considering the average size of a penis, it is safe to say that few men actually need XL condoms. However, there are still situations when you may need an extra-large condom. This is often the case when you usually wear a large size condom but need a condom to use with a G-spot cock ring.

Women using dildos and vibrators may also find it easier to cover their toys with a larger condom instead of struggling with snugger sizes.

Is there any difference between the Magnum and Jumbo condoms?

It largely depends on the brand, but usually, Jumbo condoms are larger than Magnum ones. However, we wouldn’t recommend buying condoms based on the XL, Magnum, or Jumbo claims. What some brands may label as Jumbo could be the size of a large condom from another brand. Or it could be the same size as a Magnum condom from another brand.

For these reasons, we always recommend checking the actual dimensions of the condoms you want to buy, especially when switching from one brand to another.

What brands make XL condoms?

Now you know that many condom brands manufacture XL condoms, but what are those brands, and what kind of condoms do they make? Let’s check them out.

Product name Nominal width Length Thickness Material Lubrication Texture
EXS Magnum 60mm 212mm 0.063mm Latex Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth
EXS Jumbo 69mm 221mm 0.067mm Latex Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth
My.Size 60mm 60mm 193mm 0.060mm Latex Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth
My.Size 64mm 64mm 223mm 0.060mm Latex Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth
My.Size 69mm 69mm 223mm 0.060mm Latex Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth
My.Size 72mm 72mm 223mm 0.060mm Latex Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth
Glyde Supermax 60mm 200mm 0.062mm Latex Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth
Pasante King Size 60mm 205mm 0.070mm Latex Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth
Pasante Super King 69mm 210mm 0.070mm Latex Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth
Pasante Unique 60mm 190mm 0.015mm Polyisoprene Silicone lube; non-flavoured Smooth

 

Are thick condoms safer?

As you may have noticed in the table above, almost all XL condoms are thicker than regular condoms. This happens because a thicker wall enhances durability in the case of latex condoms.

You should also know that if you’re using the right size condom, you will unlikely be bothered by this thickness since the walls are still thin enough to allow for a full range of sensations and flexible enough to allow for a full range of motion.

If you still insist on using a thinner condom, Pasante Unique could be your best choice. Pasante Unique condoms are made from polyisoprene, a plastic material that is more elastic and more resistant than latex. They’re ultra-thin, enhancing the feeling of closeness with your partner, and are also suitable for people allergic to latex.

I am allergic to latex and need a super large size condom. What options do I have?

Non-latex condoms are less popular than latex, mainly because they are more expensive. That’s why most latex condoms are easier to find than latex-free, especially if you need a size other than regular. If your typical size is 60mm, Pasante Unique is a suitable option if you or your partner are allergic to latex.

If you need a bigger size, you will have to look into alternatives, which typically include female condoms – which are made of polyurethane - and a range of other silicone intra-vaginal devices such as cervix caps and diaphragms.

Female condoms are the best solution if you’re concerned about pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. If used correctly, they are 95% effective against pregnancy and STDs. By comparison, male condoms are effective in around 98% of cases if used correctly.

If you’re only concerned about pregnancy – for instance, you’re in a monogamous relationship, and both you and your partner have no sexually transmitted infections – silicone diaphragms or sponge covers are two other options you could use.

Diaphragms aren’t as effective as condoms, especially if you plan to use them without spermicide. Sponge covers contain spermicide, but they are only around 86% effective.

Is spermicide harmful?

Many people believe that spermicide can increase the effectiveness of condoms and that it has no side effects. However, this couldn’t be further from the truth.

Whilst spermicide may improve the effectiveness of some contraceptive methods, such as silicone diaphragms, cervix caps, and sponge covers, it has no effect on the actual effectiveness of condoms. Nevertheless, using spermicide could result in some nasty side effects.

For one, spermicide lubricants can cause vaginal irritation, with symptoms including discomfort or pain during intercourse, rashes, itchiness, and skin lacerations. Vaginal irritation also increases the risk of contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

Spermicide may also increase the risk of urinary tract infections in women by altering vaginal flora. Without a healthy bacterial environment in your vaginal area, E. Coli can spread easily from your anal region toward the urethra, where it can thrive and cause cystitis.

In men, spermicide is often responsible for penile irritation and burning during urination. Penile irritation has similar symptoms to vaginal irritation.

For these reasons, if you need an XL condom larger than 60mm but you or your partner are allergic to latex, a female condom used with non-spermicidal lubricant is the best alternative to a male condom.

What happens if I use a smaller size condom?

Men with a latex allergy or whose partners are allergic to latex may be tempted to buy a smaller size, non-latex condom. Alternatively, you may like the snugger fit of a smaller size condom. Whilst you could use a smaller condom without it breaking, chances are it won’t feel comfortable. Here are a few reasons why you should avoid using a smaller condom:

My partner needs extra stimulation. Are there any textured XL condoms I can use?

The vast majority of extra large condoms have a smooth, silky texture, and finding textured XL condoms is hard. However, if your partner needs extra stimulation, you could consider using a vibrating cock ring.

Those looking specifically for increased vaginal stimulation may find that a G-spot vibrating ring is a sweet alternative to a textured condom. This type of ring goes on the penis, directly under the glans, and is hold in place by a standard condom.

Pulsating vibrations stimulate the G-spot and can also contribute to increasing pleasure and delaying ejaculation in men. This type of ring is also suitable for same-sex couples to use for prostate stimulation.

How can I buy XL condoms without being awkward?

Using condoms whenever you have sex is the responsible thing to do, and you should never feel awkward about it. However, if you do feel embarrassed or don’t want your parents or community to find out that you’re buying condoms, the easiest thing to do is to buy them online, right here at Condoms.uk.

Not only do we have a wide range of XL condoms, but our discreet delivery policy ensures that nobody will know what’s inside your parcel.

At Condoms.uk, we only sell 100% genuine condoms sourced directly from brands or their official distributors in the UK. All condoms we sell are electronically tested for safety and comply with CE and BSI standards. Browse our range now to find the best condoms for you.